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JetBlue Coronavirus Flight Cancelations and Schedule Changes
Airline & Aviation News

JetBlue Coronavirus Flight Cancelations and Schedule Changes

Posted: June 08,2020
by Rosen Valchev
Last updated: August 19,2020

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The coronavirus pandemic hit all airlines really hard drying up their revenue and profits. The largest low-cost U.S. airline JetBlue was no exception. 

As all major domestic and international airlines, JetBlue had to slash a big portion of its scheduled flights. For example, the airline had to cut the devastating 80% of its home area New York flights because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Despite that JetBlue was the leading carrier to adjust its policies due to the coronavirus pandemic. Other airlines followed the lead of JetBlue to waive change and cancelation fees. First for new flights and then for already existing flights that passengers want to postpone or cancel. 

1. JetBlue flight cancelations

When you decide to cancel or change a flight booked by cash or credit points, JetBlue will issue the so-called Travel Bank credits. They will create a Travel Bank account where you can use the credits towards a future flight.

However, you can access your Travel Bank account with the same credentials as your TrueBlue account if you are a TrueBlue member. Also, JetBlue issue travel credits as a form of compensation, if they caused you inconvenience.

JetBlue-Departure-Delay

When you do the math JetBlue has one of the most expensive cancelation policies. At least for low-cost travels. At the moment of writing this article, JetBlue has 5 different fare types, Blue Basic, Blue, Blue Plus, Blue Extra and Mint.

The Blue Basic tickets which cost the lowest price can’t be changed or canceled.  For the Blue and Blue Plus flights are subject to cancelation and change. The fees are the same for both and are as follows:

As you can see it doesn’t make a big difference for low-cost tickets. In most scenarios even though you could change or cancel your low-cost fare you will lose a huge portion of the ticket’s value.

The Blue Extra fare which replaces the previous Blue Flex fare is more expensive, yet there is no change or cancellation fee associated with it. However, the premium Mint fare always has a $200 flat cancellation or change fee.

You also have the option to purchase a refundable ticket on any of the 5 fare types described above. Nevertheless, this could be significantly more expensive. 

However, that is the usual cancelation and change policy. In the current coronavirus situation, JetBlue adjusted its policy.

JetBlue Coronavirus Flight cancelation

For travel booked by June 30, 2020, they waive all cancelation and rebooking fees. If you have travel bank credits expiring between February 27 and June 30, the new expiration date is December 31, 2020.

Moreover, the travel Bank credits issued between February 27 and June 30 for flight purchases will now have a 24-month expiration period as opposed to the typical 12 months.

Nevertheless, you are obliged to pay any difference in the fares. So if you cancel or change and your future trip are more expensive you should pay the difference in prices.

To make sure you receive up to date information you can visit JetBlue’s corona travel alerts page


Read More: 5 Best Travel Credit Cards of 2020 After COVID-19


2. JetBlue award tickets change or cancelation

Unfortunately, when you want to change or cancel an award ticket booked with TruBlue points the cancellation fee will be determined by the cash value of your ticket.

For example, if you spotted a deal and used let’s say 11,000 TrueBlue points for a $158 worth flight you will need to pay a $150 cash fee to cancel or change that flight.

If you choose to cancel or change which is highly unlikely for this specific example, the TruBlue points will be redeposited into your TrueBlue account once the fee is paid.

Regardless of all, as we already mentioned, JetBlue adjusted its policy due to the evolving coronavirus situation. All cancellation and change fees will be waived according to the terms and dates we already examined earlier.

Also, they are providing some cool bonuses. Like other airlines, they are trying to stimulate people to travel in the upcoming season despite the risks. If you are a TruBlue member you are eligible to receive double awards on flights.

You can get double TrueBlue points if you book your flight between May 14, 2020 – June 15, 2020, to travel between May 14, 2020 – January 4, 2021. That means you will get 2 points instead of 1 per every $1 spent on Blue Basic Fares and 6 points instead of 3 for all other JetBlue fare types.

Furthermore, JetBlue is lowering the threshold for enrolling in their 1 tier elite status program – Mosaic.

JetBlue-Mosaic-Program

Also, those who are already Mosaic members can relax. Their benefits are now extended and are valid through December 31, 2021.

How To contact JetBlue?

JetBlue has made it pretty easy to change or cancel your ticket online. Simply log in to your TrueBlue account, select “Manage Flights” and choose the flight you want to change or cancel. 

If you don’t have a TrueBlue account just go to their website, select “My Trips” then “Manage Trips” and use your flight confirmation code and last name to find your flight.

Anyways, if you need additional assistance you can always contact JetBlue at 800-JET-BLUE (538-2583). They also have a chat pop up when you visit their website. However, when I selected contact us at the bottom of the chat field it says that JetBlue is not currently available to chat.

In the last years, the airline has been very active on social media as well. You can connect with them on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or subscribe to their Youtube channel.

What if JetBlue cancels or changes the flight?

It is very important to know that if the airline cancels or changes the flight you are entitled to a full cash refund by LAW.

That is not just for JetBlue but rather a Federal  Law which all airlines must abide by.

Despite that, all major airlines are having a hard time and they don’t want to lose liquid cash. That is why most companies will try to sneak you a voucher or travel credit.

For example, if your flight is delayed with more than 60 minutes JetBlue has the following policy. 

JetBlue-Change-Refund

Still, if JetBlue doesn’t want to provide you with a full refund after they cancel a flight, remember you legally have the right to demand a cash refund and they should provide it.

If you booked your flight through a third-party travel agency like Kayak or Expedia, the same applies. Most online travel agents have adjusted their policy to match the airlines’. However, you should contact the travel agency first to request your refund.

If you used credit card point and portals like Chase Ultimate Rewards Travel Portal or Amex Travel you there are some flights which you may be able to cancel online.

Despite that, you still may have to contact your bank provider directly to request a refund.

Points Panda coronavirus travel concierge

Although you already know how to handle your JetBlue flight cancellation, things are changing rapidly.

And we all know it is not just the airline. When you travel post-pandemic you have to take into account so many things. If you are not careful you can spend your vacation under quarantine or even end up stuck in a foreign country. 

That is why we made our Points Panda coronavirus travel concierge service. Our expert team of travel hackers eats and breathes travel. We can answer all of your questions and assist you to make your post-pandemic trip as seamless as possible.

Responses are not provided or commissioned by the bank advertiser. Responses have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the bank advertiser. It is not the bank advertiser’s responsibility to ensure all posts and/or questions are answered.

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